Stock landscape and outdoor adventure photos from Oregon, Washington, and the Pacific Northwest

Posts Tagged ‘backcountry’

What I did on my Summer Vacation. By Troy McMullin

With the New Year starting, it’s fun to think back over the past few months and reflect on what was another great season of adventure in Central Oregon. This past summer started out a little rough (e.g., watching my camera and tripod tumble off of a 200-foot cliff), but it eventually gave way to a reasonably fruitful year. My efforts did not produce as many pure landscape images as I would have liked, but I tried to keep my options open and find a few good photos on every hike. That typically defaulted to me striking a pose in front of various Central Oregon landmarks–which is not exactly the fine art I would have liked to capture, but then again, I have a tough time passing on an opportunity to add to Pacific Crest Stock’s ever-growing Outdoor Adventure Gallery . . . so, here is a brief summary of some of my favorite hikes from 2010.

 

 

Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area: This was one of those impossibly challenging cross-country (i.e., “no trail”) treks that I planned (rather poorly) using Google Earth and a hefty dose of optimism. Although the approach looked fairly easy online, I quickly realized that I had been deceived and within a half-hour of leaving the Jeep, I was decidedly happy that I had chosen not to invite anyone else along on this little adventure. Anyone else would have surely killed me for dragging them up and down these remote valleys in what turned out to be a failed attempt to reach a never-before-visited viewpoint of Mount Jefferson. I thought for sure I was going to be killed and eaten by bears before making it out of the Wilderness on this day. About mid-way through the hike, I changed course and headed for the safety of the Jefferson Park area. This viewpoint isn’t quite what I planned, but then again, dying in the jowls of a hungry bear wasn’t necessarily part of the plan either.

 

 

Hiking in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area.

Hiking in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area.

 

 

Fall Color in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness

Fall Color in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness

 

 

Ochoco Mountains: This hike started out as a fairly nice evening stroll up along a wildflower-filled trail in the Ochoco Mountains. There’s a great viewpoint at the top of Lookout Mountain, but if you stay to take sunset pictures (like the one below), you better have a headlamp or be prepared to trail run out in the dark. Guess which one I did. Yep, I found myself sprinting back to the Jeep in total darkness. Real smart.

 

 

Hiking in the Ochoco Mountains near Prineville, Oregon

Hiking in the Ochoco Mountains near Prineville, Oregon

 

Smith Rock:  These photos were taken on a great mountain biking trip to Smith Rock State Park near Terrebonne, Oregon. If you haven’t ridden at Smith Rock, put it on your list of 2011 Resolutions. It’s one of the most surreal places you will ever ride.

 

 

Mountain biking in Smith Rock State Park

Mountain biking in Smith Rock State Park

 

Perched high on the cliffs at Smith Rock State Park

Perched high on the cliffs at Smith Rock State Park

 

Three Sisters Wilderness:  I was fortunate enough to get into the Three Sisters backcountry area on several different occasions in 2010. Each of these trips ranks among my favorites for the year.

 

 

Backpacking in the Three Sisters Wilderness Area

Backpacking in the Three Sisters Wilderness Area

 

Hiking near Central Oregon’s Broken Top Mountain

Hiking near Central Oregon’s Broken Top Mountain

 

Backpacking in the Three Sisters Wilderness Area

Backpacking in the Three Sisters Wilderness Area

 

Crooked River Canyon: Central Oregon has so many great desert scenes, it’s hard to choose where to go first. I spent quite bit of time this past Spring exploring the peaks and valleys surrounding the Deschutes River and Crooked River. Here are a few photos from some of my favorite desert hikes:

 

 

 

 

Hiking in the canyons near Crooked River Ranch

Hiking in the canyons near Crooked River Ranch

 

Sitting on the cliffs above the Crooked River at Smith Rock State Park

Sitting on the cliffs above the Crooked River at Smith Rock State Park

 

Trail running in the Crooked River Canyon near Prineville, Oregon

Trail running in the Crooked River Canyon near Prineville, Oregon

 

 

Other Miscellaneous Trips: There were lots of other great days in the past year where I was lucky enough to get outside and enjoy some fresh air. Here are a few miscellaneous photos from some of those days:

 

 

Backpacking near the Mount Washington Wilderness Area

Backpacking near the Mount Washington Wilderness Area

 

 

Autumn color at Silver Falls near Silverton, Oregon

Autumn color at Silver Falls near Silverton, Oregon

 

Mountain biking above Tumalo Creek Canyon

Mountain biking above Tumalo Creek Canyon

 

Enjoying a sunset (and a beer) at the Oregon coast

Enjoying a sunset (and a beer) at the Oregon coast

 

Snow hiking near Tumalo Falls

Snow hiking near Tumalo Falls

 

I hope that 2011 is as good to me as 2010. Cheers!

 

Posted by Troy McMullin


Stock Photos from Oregon’s Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area: Forever Young

Henry David Thoreau once said, “None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm.” If Thoreau was correct, then I think Oregon’s Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area could be considered a virtual fountain of youth, because in my experience, it is almost impossible to visit this area without being overwhelmed with enthusiasm. In fact, anyone who peruses our photo galleries on Pacific Crest Stock probably can’t help but notice that Mike Putnam and I have a great deal of enthusiasm for the meadows and valleys surrounding Mount Jefferson. It really doesn’t matter if you are hiking into Jefferson Park, Coffin Mountain, or the Cathedral Rocks Canyon, there is almost no way to go wrong . . . as long as your camera works when you get there.

Pacific Crest Stock photo of Oregon's Mount Jefferson and purple lupine overlooking the Cathedral Rocks Canyon

Pacific Crest Stock photo of Oregon's Mount Jefferson and purple lupine overlooking the Cathedral Rocks Canyon

Pacific Crest Stock photo of Oregon's Mount Jefferson and the big bear grass bloom near Coffin Mountain

Pacific Crest Stock photo of Oregon's Mount Jefferson and the big bear grass bloom near Coffin Mountain

A few years ago, I was hurrying around in preparation for a day hike into Jefferson Park. It was mid-August and I knew that the meadows around Russell Lake would be overflowing with flowers. As I ran frantically from room to room in the house gathering up all of my equipment, I set my camera backpack on the kitchen counter. On one of my passes back through the kitchen, I quickly filled a Nalgene bottle, and slid it into the mesh pocket on the side of my backpack. The weight of the water bottle immediately caused my backpack to shift and tumble from the counter top down to the hard slate floor. I lunged to catch the pack, but by the time I had a grasp on its top strap, the bottom of the bag had already crashed into the ground. I said a few choice words and then gave my camera a quick inspection. Everything looked fine. Whew!

I loaded my gear into the Jeep and started making my way to the Whitewater trailhead just up the road from Detroit Lake. I ended up starting the 10-mile round trip hike later than anticipated and after a steep climb to the top of the first ridge, I realized that I needed to run if I wanted to make it to the meadows and still have time to get out of the woods before dark. NOTE: Now is probably a good time to mention that I really despise running. Many of my friends are exceptional runners; they actually claim to love it. But me, I’m just not a runner. Give me a bike or some skate skis, but please never ask me to run.

I reluctantly jogged a few hundred yards up the trail and then I temporarily slowed to a brisk hike as I contemplated whether or not I really had enough time to cover all of the ground in front of me even if I was able to run the whole way. But then, images of Jefferson Park in full bloom consumed my thoughts and convinced me that I could definitely make it . . . as long as I would be willing to run. And with that, I picked up my trekking poles and started the very miserable task of trail running up 1800 vertical feet of backcountry trails with a heavy backpack and worn out boots. Up over the ridges; around the corners; and through the creek crossings. I ran the whole way into Jefferson Park.

 Pacific Crest Stock photo of purple lupine wildflowers blooming in Jefferson Park with Mount Jefferson looming in the background.

Pacific Crest Stock photo of purple lupine wildflowers blooming in Jefferson Park with Mount Jefferson looming in the background.

As soon as I got to the meadows in Jefferson Park, I could see that my timing was perfect. The purple lupine and Indian paintbrush were in their most glorious states. I rushed through the maze of flower-filled trails that lead to Russell Lake and found the perfect spot along one its tributaries. Mount Jefferson was being gently lit by the westerly sun, and with that majestic mountain looming directly overhead, I carefully set up my tripod, composed the shot, and pressed the shutter button. But nothing happened. I checked the power button; the camera was on. I took the camera off of the tripod and checked the battery compartment; the battery was where it belonged. I took the battery in and out and turned the power switch on and off multiple times, but nothing could bring my camera back to life. Then, as I was spinning the camera around, I noticed that one of the bottom corners was badly dented and I remembered how my camera had fallen off the kitchen counter earlier in the day. Realizing that the camera had been ruined and that I jogged all of the way into Jefferson Park for nothing, I took my cell phone out of my pocket, pointed it at the mountain, hung my head in disgrace and clicked a single low-resolution digital phone picture.

Then, I started walking—not running—back to my Jeep.

The author, Troy McMullin, feeling rather youthful while hiking in Oregon's Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area.

The author, Troy McMullin, feeling rather youthful while hiking in Oregon's Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area.

NOTE: If you want to see additional images from the Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area, you can browse our pictures in the Mountain gallery on Pacific Crest Stock or search the site for “Mount Jefferson.”


Mount Washington Photography: The Trail Less Traveled

I’m amazed that I don’t see more pictures from the Mount Washington Wilderness Area, which is located just outside of Sisters, Oregon.  It is one of my favorite places in Central Oregon; a virtual Mecca of possible explorations. 

 

 

 Central Oregon's Mt. Washington in fall with a fresh autumn snow fall

Central Oregon's Mt. Washington in fall with a fresh autumn snow fall

 

Perhaps one of the reasons that few photographers have experience with Mount Washington is that there are almost no trails leading into its base.  To get to the cover shots, it takes a moderately good fitness level, some very good navigation skills, and a ton of patience.  For example, two of my favorite approaches into Mount Washington require 10-mile cross-country slogs through a maze of beetle-downed lodge pole pine trees.  To say that the terrain is “littered” with downfall is a gross understatement.  There are sections where you literally hike for an hour on nothing but downed trees.  With every exhausting stride, you are either stepping up onto a fallen tree or down off of a fallen tree.  One gap in concentration, and you run the risk of twisting a knee and being stranded in the very dense (and non-cell-phone- friendly) forest.  

 

 

But still, the rewards are totally worth it. In all of my trips into the backcountry surrounding Mount Washington, I have never seen another soul.  I’ve occasionally heard the voices of climbers on the upper slopes, but I’ve never run into anyone.  I think it is one of the most isolated and beautiful settings in all of Oregon.

 

 

Mt. Washington and pasque flowers high in the Mt. washington Wilderness area

Mt. Washington and pasque flowers high in the Mt. washington Wilderness area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo ofMt. Washington, Indian Paintbrush, mountain heather in the Central Oregon cascades

photo ofMt. Washington, Indian Paintbrush, mountain heather in the Central Oregon cascades

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In some ways, this area is even more inviting and easier to access in the winter or early spring because huge snow drifts cover most of the fallen trees.  Each year, I like to wait for the forest service roads to melt off a little (so I can drive in as far as possible), and then I snowshoe or ski into the Eastern or Northern faces of Mount Washington.  This time of year, snow and ice still cling to the mountain’s huge rocky face giving it an even greater sense of awe.  Standing at its base, the Teton-esque vertical rise from the valley below is nothing short of spectacular. 

 

 

Winter snow scene of Mt. Washington, in the Central Oregon Cascades

Winter snow scene of Mt. Washington, in the Central Oregon Cascades

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter image of Central Oregon's Mt. Washington in winter under sunny blue skies.

Winter image of Central Oregon's Mt. Washington in winter under sunny blue skies.

 

Posted by Troy McMullin

 

 

NOTE: If you want to see additional images from the Mount Washington Wilderness Area, you can browse the pictures in the Mountain Gallery on our Pacific Crest Stock photography site or search the site for “Mount Washington.”