Stock landscape and outdoor adventure photos from Oregon, Washington, and the Pacific Northwest

Posts Tagged ‘bend stock photos’

Visit Bend Guide, Our next Oregon Photo success!

I am proud to announce that Bend ,Oregon’s premier tourism guide once again has one of our images for a cover shot.  The “Visit Bend” guide has established itself as arguably the most informative , attractive and well organized guide in Oregon.  Our ongoing relationship with Visit Bend, is an honor that we hope will continue long term.  The Visit Bend Tourism Guide cover can be seen below.

Visit Bend Tourism Guide

Visit Bend Tourism Guide

Doug, Lynnette, and the rest of the crew are excellent to work with and they are great ambassadors for our city.  Visit Bend has done an excellent job of bringing in events such as the 2010 Cyclocross National Championships, The 2010 Road riding nationals, and the 2011 Mountain Bike National Championships.  All great events that fit well with the personality Bend.

The above image of South Sister from Sparks Lake is one of my personal favorites.  To learn more information about this beautiful landscape photo and to see the whole image, visit my personal website by visiting the following link.  Sparks Lake!

Thanks for Reading,

Mike Putnam


Photos of Desert Wildflowers at Central Oregon’s proposed Badlands Wilderness Area

This blog entry is more of a public service announcement than an overwhelming show of photographic talent.  My daughter, Emma, and I recently hiked the Flatirons Rock Trail in the proposed Badlands Wilderness area located about 16 miles East of Bend, Oregon and desert wildflowers there are about as good as I’ve ever seen them.  It is a perfect time for a hike in the Badlands so that you can appreciate how beautiful of an area it is.  Local groups, including the good people at ONDA-Oregon Natural Desert Association have done an immense amount of work to establish this wonderful place as a fully protected wilderness area.

Stock Photo of Desert wildflowers glowing in the Badlands area East of Bend, Oregon

Stock Photo of Desert wildflowers glowing in the Badlands area East of Bend, Oregon

It is my opinion that this special area of Central Oregon should be protected as soon as possible.  Lots of good reasons back up my opinion  on this issue, including:  1. It is beautiful and accessible for a huge portion of the year as it’s desert climate usually keeps this area free of snow in the winter when alpine trails are only available to hardcore backcountry skiers.  2. A huge majority of the residents of Bend and Central Oregon support the idea of this area becoming an official Wilderness Area.  3. This area is much better protected now that it is a proposed wilderness area than it probably was previously.  I’ve spent lots of time in many of the desert areas around Bend, Oregon, mostly scouting for stock photos.  Virtually everywhere in the desert areas I’ve been to, with the exception of the Badlands study area, I’ve been shocked by the amount of garbage that has been dumped randomly around these otherwise beautiful areas.  I’m of the opinion that garbage begets more garbage.  When a place becomes downtrodden with debris, a misconception develops that it is OK to litter and otherwise pollute in that area.  I don’t know how the Badlands study area looked 15 years ago, but is virtually free of any sort of debris currently and I do know how non-study desert areas look today, and it’s not good.

 Photo/picture of Old Growth Juniper Tree in the bend Badlands Area
Photo/picture of Old Growth Juniper Tree in the bend Badlands Area

If establishing any desert area as preserves it as well as the Badlands area has been, then I am in favor of the protection.  I won’t go into the nuances of what activities are restricted and which are not in Wilderness areas but I will say that wilderness areas are open to all people but not necessarily all uses, which is more than fair.

Photo of desert flowers blooming in the Badlands area east of Bend , Oregon

Photo of desert flowers blooming in the Badlands area east of Bend , Oregon

The entire sixish mile long loop trail to flatiron rock was decorated with pockets of color like the wildflowers shown above, which I think are some sort of desert aster.  There were also countless old growth juniper trees along the trail.  Their ancient and severe form  exude character and determination.  Their ability to defy time and the harsh high desert climate in the Oregon desert should earn them the respect of any in tune naturalist.  I’ve heard that some of the older juniper trees in this area are over 1,000 years old.  Amazing!

Photo of an old growth juniper snag in the Badlands area near Bend Oregon

Photo of an old growth juniper snag in the Badlands area near Bend Oregon

As the desert is a…..desert, you’ll want to bring sunblock and water and snacks for the family.  As summer is beginning to heat up, I’d also recommend you plan your trips in the morning or evening as your hiking will be a bit more pleasant if you can avoid the mid-day heat.  The following photo is of a wildflower that I believe is called a “phacelia” which has beautiful lavender colored blooms and like many of the desert wildflowers, it has a very short blooms season, so go for a hike soon if you want to see the phacelia in bloom this year.

Picture of a phacelia blooming in the Badlands area east of Bend, Oregon.

Picture of a phacelia blooming in the Badlands area east of Bend, Oregon.

This pretty little flower fades from lavender to a lighter lavender to a light green on the inside of the bloom and it has a pleasing glow about it, making it one of my favorite desert wildflowers.  The following flowers in the foreground of a classic desert scene are desert monkeyflowers.  Their rich pink blooms with yellow centers provide a striking display of color in what would otherwise be an earth-toned palette along the Flatiron trail. This appears to be a great year for monkeyflowers in the Oregon high desert.

Image of monkeyflowers blooming in the high desert area of Central Oregon

Image of monkeyflowers blooming in the high desert area of Central Oregon

In the mid-ground of the above high desert photo are some yellow flowers which are shown in the following photo.

Photo of "Oregon Sunshine" blooming in the Badlands area near Bend Oregon

Photo of "Oregon Sunshine" blooming in the Badlands area near Bend Oregon

The above flowers, “Oregon Sunshine” are some of the happiest flowers anywhere.  In years of high spring precipitation, like this one, they can almost form mats of cheerful yellow flowers.  They are another of the bonuses found along the Flatiron trail if you can get there soon.  The next to last image in this blog entry Taken in the Flatiron rock formation is of my favorite photo model and hiking, partner, Emma, who also happens to be my daughter!  She was a wonderful companion throughout the hike, as she always is.  She was also very patient with my photographic habits.  All these traits plus she makes me smile everyday, make me feel very lucky.

Emma in the Flatiron rock formation east of Bend, Oregon

Emma in the Flatiron rock formation east of Bend, Oregon

I should mention that the brief hike to the top of the Flatiron rock formation is well worth the extra effort as the views of the Central Oregon Cascades over the high desert are stunning.

The take home message from this story is that  if you live in Central Oregon, now is a great time to experience the beauty of the the proposed Badlands Wilderness area east of Bend, Oregon.  The wildflowers won’t last long so get out soon and when you return from your desert adventure, contact your senator and tell them that The Badlands should be permanently protected as a fully designated Wilderness area!  For more info regarding the Badlands, please visit ONDA’s website.

Photo of dwarf monkeyflower in the proposed Badlands Wilderness Area East of Bend, Oregon

Photo of dwarf monkeyflower in the proposed Badlands Wilderness Area East of Bend, Oregon

For more photos of the beautiful desert areas of Central Oregon, please visit our main stock photo website, Pacific Crest Stock by clicking the following link….High Desert photos.

Thanks for visiting,

Mike Putnam


Oregon Coast Photos: Oceanside Escape

The Oregon coast is an absolutely extraordinary place, especially if you happen to enjoy taking pictures.  With a tide table and a little bit of luck, a photographer can find endless opportunities to capture that perfect shot.  I recently had one such opportunity while visiting the quaint little town of Oceanside, Oregon.  

Oceanside, which is located along the Three Capes Scenic Loop just west of Tillamook, has one of the most unique beaches on the coast.  While it may seem relatively ordinary from the main parking area, a short walk reveals a rock tunnel that cuts through the huge headwall at the northern end of the beach.  On the other side of the tunnel, photographers are greeted with gorgeous views of the Three Arches Rocks and another big collection of sea stacks that are part of the Oregon Islands.  If the tide is low enough, you can also climb around the northern-most part of the Islands to another hidden beach that is normally blocked by the tide line.

 

Seastacks in Oceanside, Oregon

Seastacks in Oceanside, Oregon

 

 

I’ve been to Oceanside many times in the past, and although I’ve made it to the hidden beach a few times before, I’ve never had the timing that I needed to really get the photo that I was wanting—until recently.  On my last trip to the coast, I checked the tide tables and noticed that there was going to be a negative tide (-2 feet) occurring in Oceanside around the time that the sun would be setting.  If everything worked out well, I knew that I should be able to get around to the hidden beach and shoot the sea stacks as they were silhouetted against the setting sun.

 

My mother happened to be out visiting from St Louis, Missouri and since she had never been to Oceanside before, I thought it would be a nice place to take her.  She and I packed up my two older kids and we made the short trek from our beach house in Pacific City up to Oceanside.  As we arrived, I noticed that the clouds had started to form out at sea and I became very optimistic that I was finally going to get the photo that I had wanted since the first time that I set foot on this beach a few years earlier. 

 

There was about an hour remaining before sunset, so I spent a little bit of time playing with the kids and taking pictures of them as they splashed around the tide pools  . . .

 

 

My 6 year old daughter, Ella helping me scout for pictures.

My 6 year old daughter, Ella helping me scout for pictures.

 

 

 

 

My 4 year old son Jacob, having fun on the beach

My 4 year old son Jacob, having fun on the beach

 

 

 . . . and then I put on my “serious photographer” hat and went to work.  I grabbed the tripod, and in a very organized fashion, I began methodically moving my way up the beach looking for interesting ways to frame the ocean and the various rock formations. 

 

As the sun got lower and lower, I got farther and farther up the beach until I had finally reached a spot where all of the sea stacks lined up in a way that gave me a nice balanced composition.  I positioned my tripod in the sinking sand and tried to steady it as best as I could for what I knew was going to be a very long exposure.  I clicked the shutter button and waited patiently until the image was finally revealed on my camera’s LCD panel. I looked at the image and then let out a big smile and a sigh of relief, satisfied that I had finally captured my long-awaited image. 

 

Sunset on the Oregon Islands in Oceanside

Sunset on the Oregon Islands in Oceanside

 

 

Not long after looking at the image above, a wave came up and tickled my toes.  It kind of caught me by surprise and when I looked back along the shoreline, I noticed that the tide had started coming back in.  My previously wide open beach was getting progressively narrower and narrower and I realized that if I didn’t start making my way back toward the tunnel, I was going to get trapped on this side of the rocks.  But as I hustled back down the beach, the sunset was getting more and more dramatic, and I just couldn’t resist the temptation to take a few more photographs.  At one point, I climbed up on a rock with the intent of using it as foreground material when a sneaker wave rushed in and completely surrounded me with water.  I was now standing on a rock, thirty feet out into the ocean, with thousands of dollars worth of camera equipment and a rising tide.  Slightly panicked, I stood my ground and watched as several more waves rushed in and swirled around my little island of a rock.  The waves would come in, crash up against the shoreline, and then just as one wave was about to subside, another would come in to take its place.  I was trapped.

 

 

Caption: Picture of Oceanside Sea Stacks that I took while being stranded on my “island.”

Picture of Oceanside Sea Stacks that I took while being stranded on my “island.”

 

Eventually, I began to recognize the timing of the wave pattern.  I waited for the right moment, and with a big breath, I leaped out into the receding water and then high-stepped it back to dry land while holding my camera and tripod over my head.  That little episode was enough of a wake-up call for me, and without any further ado, I packed up my camera and jogged around the rock wall and back through the pitch-black tunnel. 

 

The sun was completely under water by the time that I made it back to the parking area, and as I approached the Jeep, I could see my mother waiting there and two tiny shadows racing toward me on the beach yelling “Daddy, Daddy!”  My children have started doing this every time that they see me returning from a photo expedition, and it always brings a huge smile to my face and reminds me of just how lucky I am. As happy as I was to have gotten some beautiful photos on that night–and to have escaped the rock incident without soaking any of my camera gear–neither of those compared to the joy that I felt when I saw my children running up with excitement as I returned. Without a doubt, that was the most rewarding part of the entire experience, and the one that I will remember long after the photo files have faded.

 

Posted by Troy McMullin

NOTE: If you want to see additional pictures from Oceanside, you can browse our Pacific Coast gallery on the Pacific Crest Stock photography site or search the site for “Oceanside.”


Welcome to the Pacific Crest Stock Photography Blog

 

After countless days of hiking together and talking about starting a new stock photography agency, Mike Putnam and Troy McMullin have finally started to make some serious progress.  The Pacific Crest Stock website is nearing completion, and with this entry, our photography blog has become a reality.  We hope that you will sign up for the RSS feed or check back regularly as we will use this blog to share new stock images and a variety of interesting stories from our adventures as landscape photographers.  From stories about being stranded high on the cliffs of Three Fingered Jack to near-death mountain lion attacks, this blog will hopefully be an entertaining way to stay abreast of what’s new and exciting in the lives of a few hard-working photographers trying to start a new business.  

For a sneak peek at the Pacific Crest Stock website, follow one of the gallery links on the right-hand side of the blog page.

Thanks for visiting, and please stay tuned!

Cheers,

Mike and Troy

 

Troy and Mike toasting to Pacific Crest Stock

Troy and Mike toasting to Pacific Crest Stock