Stock landscape and outdoor adventure photos from Oregon, Washington, and the Pacific Northwest

Posts Tagged ‘central oregon photographers’

Photos of Tumalo Falls and the Waterfalls of the Tumalo Creek Basin

We at Pacific Crest Stock have always considered ourselves fortunate to live in Central Oregon where it is beautiful and where there is immense environmental diversity.  From the badlands east of Bend to the rainforests west of Bend with old growth Ponderosa forests and snow capped volcanoes in between.   Bend, Oregon is on the edge of the high desert which is considered to extend from the Cascade Mountain Range to the Rocky Mountain Range.  Perhaps, the important thing to remember is that we are on the edge of the high desert and not in the middle of it.  Otherwise, we wouldn’t have huge trees and many waterfalls near our fair city.  We had lots of hits on our website looking for waterfalls and specifically waterfalls of Central Oregon, so finally we’re going to give a little information and several photos of some of those waterfalls.  We have great photographs of some of these waterfalls and others, well, we know we need to go back to at some point! Arguably, the foremost waterfall in the minds of most Central Oregonians is the majestic Tumalo Falls.   Tumalo Falls is no stranger to visitors and it shouldn’t be as it is quite awe inspiring and very visitor friendly.  Located only 10 miles west of Bend, on Skyliners road which is a westward extension of Galveston Road.
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In the winter, the road to Tumalo Falls is closed for the last 2.5 miles and a snow park is located at the closure.  In Summer, the road is open all the way to the falls where there is parking, a restroom, and some informational kiosks about the 1979 Bridge Creek Fire which raged through the area. Additionally, Bend’s famed water source Bridge Creek, is nearby.

Photo/picture of Central Oregon's Tumalo Falls in autumn

Photo/picture of Central Oregon's Tumalo Falls in autumn

This photo of Tumalo Falls was taken in autumn several years ago during a driving rain at the height of fall color.  In other words, don’t expect the Tumalo Falls area to be this colorful when you visit, because in the hundreds of times I’ve visited it’s only looked this good once!  Below is another photo of Tumalo Falls that I captured in summer requiring a long exposure and a total absence of wind in order to keep the purple lupines in the foreground from fluttering about.

Picture of Tumalo Falls and Purple Lupine in Central Oregon

Picture of Tumalo Falls and Purple Lupine in Central Oregon

I re-visited this site this summer and noticed that most of the purple lupine in this photo have been replaced by native grasses which is too bad for photography purposes.  Tumalo has several possible name derivations, one of which is from the Klamath Indian word “Tumallowa”  meaning icy water.  This is appropriate as Tumalo Creek is largely composed of glacial melt from high off of the Central Oregon Cascade Range.  This waterfall has one 97 foot  drop and two great viewing points.  The lower view point is obvious but the upper viewpoint is a real gem as it gives a real sense of the flow and power of this particular waterfall, making it worth the short 1/4 mile climb to the top of the falls.

Below is an image of Bridge Creek Falls which is located near to Tumalo Falls and is along the aptly named Bridge Creek Trail.

Photo of Bridge Creek falls in Central Oregon.

Photo of Bridge Creek falls in Central Oregon.

The exact location where I shot this image of Bridge creek Falls was quite scary to get to and , frankly, I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone.  I had to carefully balance on a slick, wet log while Bridge Creek raged below.  This waterfall  is located about one mile from the Tumalo Falls trail head.  To get there, start climbing the trail to the top of Tumalo Falls and take a left onto the Bridge Creek Trail and proceed about one mile where Bridge Creek will be raging on the left side of the trail.

The following waterfall, “Double Falls” is located above Tumalo Falls on Tumalo Creek.  It is one of many attractive waterfalls that are upstream of the the more well known Tumalo Falls.  Double Falls is located about 1.25 miles up stream  along the North Fork Trail which for Mt. Biking purposes is up hill only.  It is a relatively easy hike but beware of mosquitoes in summer.

Photo of Double Falls located above Tumalo Falls on Tumalo Creek.

Photo of Double Falls located above Tumalo Falls on Tumalo Creek.

If you continue hiking or biking uphill on the North Fork Trail for 3.5 miles, you will pass several other impressive waterfalls.   The next waterfall is about a mile above Double Falls.  You will then cross a bridge about half-mile later, at which point you almost get bombarded with waterfalls.  There are least 5 more waterfalls within a half-mile of the bridge.  Keep hiking because the last waterfall is probably the best.

 The grand finale waterfall on the North Fork Trail above Tumalo Falls.

The grand finale waterfall on the North Fork Trail above Tumalo Falls.

We plan on some more waterfall blog entries in the near future so stay tuned!  If you have an interest in licensing these or any of our other Central Oregon waterfall images, please visit our stock photography website at Pacific Crest Stock.

by Mike Putnam


New Central Oregon Winter Image Gallery

     We just opened a new image gallery on our main Pacific Crest Stock Photography site titled Oregon Winter Landscape Images.  Because we’ve had some requests for scenic Oregon winter landscape images from photo editors, graphic designers and photography lovers we decided we’d better oblige.  Some of the winter images are recent and some are from previous years but few have them have been licensed with any restrictions so if your interested in usage please contact us.  Below are a few teaser images with some background information regarding what sacrifices in sleep, limbs, marital bliss, etc went into making the images.  Below is one of the scenic stock images found in our new online gallery at Pacific Crest Stock.  I captured this image at Tumalo State Park after a heavy winter snowfall.  I chronicled this image in a previous post but the salient fact is that there were lots of big snow covered boulders and they frightened me.  Frankly I don’t think I’d do it again especially since I already covered the scene pretty well during that expedition and  dying alone is not my thing.  If I do go back I would probably take Troy and have him go first.

 

Stock image of Central Oregon's Tumalo State Park after a heavy winter snowfall

Stock image of Central Oregon's Deschutes River in Tumalo State Park after a heavy winter snowfall

The snow coverage on the trees and riparian bushes is great, the curvature of the Deschutes River adds an artistic touch and the ponderosa trunks in the background add some color and texture to the scene.

The following image requires a sad story, one of obsession and a forbidden lust for a familiar location.  This image is Troy McMullin’s, my partner in Pacific Crest Stock.  It’s a very attractive image of  ”The Monument” at Smith Rock State Park.  That’s not the sad part.  The sadness lies in the fact that Troy has captured over 1,000 images from this exact same location over the last 9 months.  It’s not healthy.  He’s living in a self imposed photographic version of the movie Groundhog’s day and he doesn’t want the movie to end.  I’m considering an intervention of some sort.  If anyone has any suggestions as to how I might help my good friend Troy, please leave a comment at the end of this entry.  Here is the image of beauty and sadness.

Stock image of Troy's mistress, "The Monument" in winter at Smith Rock State Park

Stock image of Troy's mistress, "The Monument" in winter at Smith Rock State Park

Enough of sadness and unhealthy obsessions.  The following image is one of mine from near Sisters, Oregon.  It is my favorite grove of ponderosa trees.  They’ve got great color to their bark and have grown in a nice arrangement and  the snow around them gives a great wintry feel to this scenic winter photo.  

Winter Stock Picture of snow covered ponderosa grove near Sisters, Oregon

Winter Stock Picture of snow covered ponderosa grove near Sisters, Oregon

 This shot was actually more difficult to capture than one might think.  It was snowing very hard at the time I was taking pictures of this ponderosa grove and I was constantly fighting snowflakes and fog on my lens. because my exposures were relatively long the snow falling snow isn’t visible.  This image and all of my images included in this entry are available as fine art prints on my print site at Mike Putnam Photography.

The next shot is another one of Troy’s which he captured high on the flanks of Mt. Washington.  You might recognize it as it was previously included as a banner shot on the front page of this website.   It is a very unique stock image in that very few people have ever been to this area of the Mt. Washington in winter.  In fact, Troy’s image is the only one I’ve ever seen from this location.  The reason that few if any other shots have been taken from here in winter is that it is really hard to get to and there are no good trails accessing the area.  Troy gave a good accounting of what went into capturing this image on a previous blog entry, Troy’s Mt. Washington Story.

Troy's stock Image of Oregon's snow covered Mt. Washington

Troy's stock Image of Oregon's snow covered Mt. Washington

 It really is a pleasure to discuss one of Troy’s images that don’t make me worry about his psychiatric health.  The image above was simply an instance of Troy exploring a dangerous alpine area off trail in winter without telling anyone where he was going after taking my canon 5D camera without telling me.  No need to worry about him , his lovely wife, or his adorable kids, right?

The following Oregon stock image is a hard earned photo of Central Oregon’s Three Sisters mountains and Broken Top as seen at sunrise from Tumalo Mountain, near Mt. Bachelor.  I recounted what went into capturing this stock image in a recent blog entry  Three Sisters Sunrise.  

 

Stock image of alpenglow on the Three Sisters and broken Top as seen from Oregon's Tumalo Mountain

Stock image of alpenglow on the Three Sisters and broken Top as seen from Oregon's Tumalo Mountain

Last up is one of my not at all crazy image of a Red Osier Dogwood along the Deschutes River.  I actually scouted this shot several times(not an unhealthy number of times) before I captured it in the middle of a winter snow storm with my large format 4×5 camera.

Image/picture of snow covered red osier dogwood along the Deschutes River in Central Oregon

Image/picture of snow covered red osier dogwood along the Deschutes River in Central Oregon

All of the images in this gallery are available for licensing as are many other great winter photos in out new Winter Stock Photos Gallery at Pacific Crest Stock.  Please visit to see how beautiful our little corner of the world is in winter!  

By:  Mike Putnam


Mount Washington Photography: The Trail Less Traveled

I’m amazed that I don’t see more pictures from the Mount Washington Wilderness Area, which is located just outside of Sisters, Oregon.  It is one of my favorite places in Central Oregon; a virtual Mecca of possible explorations. 

 

 

 Central Oregon's Mt. Washington in fall with a fresh autumn snow fall

Central Oregon's Mt. Washington in fall with a fresh autumn snow fall

 

Perhaps one of the reasons that few photographers have experience with Mount Washington is that there are almost no trails leading into its base.  To get to the cover shots, it takes a moderately good fitness level, some very good navigation skills, and a ton of patience.  For example, two of my favorite approaches into Mount Washington require 10-mile cross-country slogs through a maze of beetle-downed lodge pole pine trees.  To say that the terrain is “littered” with downfall is a gross understatement.  There are sections where you literally hike for an hour on nothing but downed trees.  With every exhausting stride, you are either stepping up onto a fallen tree or down off of a fallen tree.  One gap in concentration, and you run the risk of twisting a knee and being stranded in the very dense (and non-cell-phone- friendly) forest.  

 

 

But still, the rewards are totally worth it. In all of my trips into the backcountry surrounding Mount Washington, I have never seen another soul.  I’ve occasionally heard the voices of climbers on the upper slopes, but I’ve never run into anyone.  I think it is one of the most isolated and beautiful settings in all of Oregon.

 

 

Mt. Washington and pasque flowers high in the Mt. washington Wilderness area

Mt. Washington and pasque flowers high in the Mt. washington Wilderness area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo ofMt. Washington, Indian Paintbrush, mountain heather in the Central Oregon cascades

photo ofMt. Washington, Indian Paintbrush, mountain heather in the Central Oregon cascades

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In some ways, this area is even more inviting and easier to access in the winter or early spring because huge snow drifts cover most of the fallen trees.  Each year, I like to wait for the forest service roads to melt off a little (so I can drive in as far as possible), and then I snowshoe or ski into the Eastern or Northern faces of Mount Washington.  This time of year, snow and ice still cling to the mountain’s huge rocky face giving it an even greater sense of awe.  Standing at its base, the Teton-esque vertical rise from the valley below is nothing short of spectacular. 

 

 

Winter snow scene of Mt. Washington, in the Central Oregon Cascades

Winter snow scene of Mt. Washington, in the Central Oregon Cascades

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter image of Central Oregon's Mt. Washington in winter under sunny blue skies.

Winter image of Central Oregon's Mt. Washington in winter under sunny blue skies.

 

Posted by Troy McMullin

 

 

NOTE: If you want to see additional images from the Mount Washington Wilderness Area, you can browse the pictures in the Mountain Gallery on our Pacific Crest Stock photography site or search the site for “Mount Washington.”